Ding Thinking

Great Works Wednesday: Funny TV Ads Will Sell, But Only If They’re Smart n’ Funny

So what manner of advertising alchemy works best at recall and action in your TV commercials? Funny but smart seem to be the magical mixture, according to a summary report released by Marketing Charts (great blog - subscribe here ) is an overview of research conducted by Lab42 and Ace Metrix.

Some key respondent findings:
• 71% preferred funny ads
• 12% found educational appealing, followed by
• 8% opting for sexy
• 4% serious, and
• 3% patriotic

But what trips up most advertisers and agencies is when funny falls on its face. True humor is tough to pull off. True humor, blended with valuable consumer information is even tougher. While a commercial may be humorous, if the funny isn’t handled intelligently, then the ad’s ability to actually deliver, to bring about viewer response is lost.

“Consumers see funny ads as less informative, and are less likely to change or desire brands because of a funny ad.” In other words, funny for funny’s sake does nothing to help an ad get the job done because the audience intuitively discounts what they’re seeing.
HOWEVER… when humor is married to informative, then you’re likely to see the sales curve shift upwards.

Just over 30% of the respondents indicated that advertising should make them aware of new products, while 20% said it should educate. Advertising that entertains and educates is advertising that an American audience (in particular) is going to not just recall, but respond to. “Funny ads that performed best in effectiveness were also informative,” noted the report.

As I mentioned above, these two qualities are difficult to balance. Just ask that advertiser who shot gerbils out of a canon on a Super Bowl spot, how business is going.
Bottom line: If you’re going for funny, make sure the humor is actually funny. And that it tickles with audience-appropriate information.

About Great Works Wednesday:
These are blog posts that shine a light on those people, places, institutions and organizations that do wonderful work. It’s a step outside of the daily marketing and advertising worlds that many of us occupy, and calls attention to the outstanding thinking that may inspire or help you see things in a different light. It is an online salute to the power of great works. Click here to see Ding’s Great Works.

Great Works Wednesday: Music is my Fuel

Raise your hand if you were a Napster head in 1999-01. I have both hands up. I couldn’t download enough MP3s when this music-sharing site burst on the scene. When the operation came to a halt in 2001, I fell into a slight depression. I should have burned more CDs.

Thankfully, other brilliant minds have collaborated to bring free music back to the deserving people. Arguably one of the greatest works of the late ‘00s, Pandora Radio. According to Wikipedia, “Pandora is an automated music recommendation service and "custodian" of the Music Genome Project. (A mathematical algorithm to organize music.) The service plays musical selections similar to song suggestions entered by a user. The user provides positive or negative feedback for songs chosen by the service, which are taken into account for future selections.”

Basically, you pick an artist or genre and Pandora will stream a play list for you full of songs it thinks you will enjoy based on that selection. The only downside is, it tosses a few commercials in the middle of your play list, but those can be eliminated if you choose to upgrade your account. (As an advertiser, we have seen pretty great results targeting a Gen-Y audience for a client of ours.)

Pandora allows me to stream music from my phone all day long. My alarm clock goes off, I turn on a soothing am station using my Pandora app on my iPhone (Breakfast jams). I get into the gym and change to a heart-pumping Pandora station for my boot camp class to enjoy while I train them (workout jams). The caveat- I am a cheap bastard and I have not upgraded to the commercial-free Pandora. Therefore my class will be mid burpie-plyometric sesh and my energy -lifting station will be interrupted by some perky woman trying to sell me a Hyundai. At that point I down the volume so you can barely hear the commercial and I try to talk over it with motivating words “Come on guys! Only 37 more seconds. Push through!” Super professional, I know.

When I have the time and the brainpower to select my own songs and build my own playlists, I log in to my Spotify account. Spotify is a music streaming service that offers free streaming of selected music from a range of major and independent record labels. You can basically search for any song and listen to it instantly and for free. I usually switch over to my Spotify account over Pandora during the workday, because let’s face it; everyone likes a little “Workin’ for the Weekend” on his or her Friday afternoons at 4:30pm. Spotify let’s me play that instantly with the click of my mouse, judgment free.

Play music, create and share play lists, hear new artists, and enrich your soul. If you aren't using Pandora and Spotify for your musical library, education and enjoyment, then you aren't living. Sure you can buy songs on iTunes, but you can’t stream live music, you don’t get to hear new music similar to the artists that you love and it’s not free. If you've tried Spot and Pan and you aren't smitten, try like Songza.com or NPR.org/music/. All hail Free Music and the great minds who bring it to us on a silver platter.

About Great Works Wednesday:
These are blog posts that shine a light on those people, places, institutions and organizations that do wonderful work. It’s a step outside of the daily marketing and advertising worlds that many of us occupy, and calls attention to the outstanding thinking that may inspire or help you see things in a different light. It is an online salute to the power of great works. Click here to see Ding’s Great Works.

Great Works Wednesday: Credit Unions Are Realizing Now Is Their Time. Finally.

My spidey sense is picking up a positive economic indicator. And I boldly offer this while possessing the most basic 101-level economics course in my educational background.
Here’s what my gut says.

I recently attended the California/Nevada League of Credit Unions annual meeting in Las Vegas (my first). And by the remarks of other participants, this year was different. From credit union CEOs to the exhibition vendors, the comments universally steered around to the palpable optimism that has been absent for the past several years.

Credit unions in particular embody what I consider great work that works wonders. Truly mission driven, they are 100% committed to helping assist and advance the financial needs of their members. “People over profits” is the overall credit union MO, and it is engrained top to bottom into the CU genetic code.

But there was something richer swirling beneath the overall upswell of positivity. I sensed it runs deeper and not just because the CUs are generally experiencing a boost in business.
I think it’s the collective realization by CU leaders that credit unions are in fact not the redheaded stepchildren of the financial market. The credit union boards and executives are becoming more confident that they can run shoulder to shoulder with other financial institutions. They can stand up and compete with the Wells Fargos, the BofAs, the US Banks.

No, I’m not saying CUs can match the Goliaths in assets or marketing muscle. I’m saying they can ably provide banking services that serve their constituencies like the majors. They’re adding progressive new products and services and are staking their claim in marketplace.

It didn’t hurt that the big banks’ gluttonies were laid bare and that they heaped a generous helping of ill way and overall bad public relations upon themselves. And Bank Transfer Day, which occurred as Wall Street was being occupied, helped raise awareness of CUs in the eyes of the general account holder.

But my sense is those issues are simply fueling a momentum that was already gathering steam.

In short, credit unions are realizing now is their time. Now is their time to help small businesses grow (even if the lending cap isn’t raised). Now is their time to provide services to those who are ignored by other financial institutions. Now is the credit unions’ time step up and take on a greater role. And now really feels like it’s the right time.

About Great Works Wednesday:
These are blog posts that shine a light on those people, places, institutions and organizations that do wonderful work. It’s a step outside of the daily marketing and advertising worlds that many of us occupy, and calls attention to the outstanding thinking that may inspire or help you see things in a different light. It is an online salute to the power of great works. Click here to see Ding’s Great Works.

Great Works Wednesday: Getting remembered, in a positive way.

How do you get remembered?
If you’re a teacher, you try to truly connect with your students. You make your class engaging and interactive and you bring homemade sugar cookies weekly, like my 3rd grade substitute Mrs. Moss did.

If you’re an athlete, you excel at your sport. You score a winning touchdown with 10 seconds left on the clock, during the Super Bowl, on a broken foot, the night after you discover you were adopted.

And if you’re a commercial you tell a story. Be it funny or sentimental, you tell a story that will resonate in your target’s mind days after they’ve seen your commercial air. According to a study conducted by Adobe and Edelman Berland on consumer attitudes towards marketing and advertising:

“Ads should tell a unique story rather than just try to sell, agree 73% of US consumers.”

Take a second and think of some of the best commercials you’ve ever seen. Do they tell a story, or do they merely just push product attributes and price points? I pondered this and kept searching for reinforcements. I found this article on Business2community.com that also hails the art of storytelling.

They call out the 2012 Proctor & Gamble Olympic Moms commercial:

I, too, remember that commercial from this summer. It stuck with me, as any good story would. Another attribute of a good story is that it can live beyond the original conductor. Stories are meant to be told, shared, and celebrated. A good commercial will pass spread through the YouTube and Gmail waves faster than the news of Justin Beiber’s and Selena Gomez’s relationship demise. Well… in a perfect world it would.

Commemorate good work. If you see a commercial you love, share it. Remember there are many people behind that black sheet working hard to make you smile, laugh cry, think and remember and pass on that story. Tip your hat to their creative juices.

Our agency was fortunate to be able to create a commercial for our client Greater Nevada Credit Union, that told the story of a young man on the pursuit of a greater life. The spot alludes to the internal struggles he deals with and the obstacles he is facing in life. It all comes down to making decisions and going with your gut. We found the target audience sharing it and discussing on Twitter. That redistribution was an unintentional bonus for our client. We didn’t mind it, either.
Check it out:

http://dingthinking.com/projects/gncu-tv3.php

Human communication is built upon storytelling. “Once upon a time…” The bottom line with any ad push is to keep in mind that humans respond to humans, not laundry lists or percentages or your organization’s self-serving chest-thumpings.

What’s your favorite commercial? Does it tell a story? Why do you remember it?

About Great Works Wednesday:
These are blog posts that shine a light on those people, places, institutions and organizations that do wonderful work. It’s a step outside of the daily marketing and advertising worlds that many of us occupy, and calls attention to the outstanding thinking that may inspire or help you see things in a different light. It is an online salute to the power of great works. Click here to see Ding’s Great Works.

“What the hell are you showing me…?” First and foremost, advertising and design are businesses of understanding and conveying context.

The challenge we face every time we walk in to the client’s office on Presentation Day is to provide context. Ninety percent of our job is to help our client move from their current point of reference and usher them along on the journey that we’ve been traveling as we developed their new logo or their advertising campaign or their marketing initiative.
And it is without a doubt the most frightening and rewarding aspect of the advertising business, in my estimation. Presentation Day is fraught with speculation:
“Will I be able to adequately convey how the Occupy Wall Street movement had an impact on why we developed ad concepts with this particular wording…?”
“Is my intuition and my research enough to convince them that this color palette is not popular now, but it will be…?”
And so on, and so on, and so on. It’s pure elation and time for celebration when we do bring it all together and our client sees the connections.
So it was with wonder and amazement that I watched this video, which found its way to my inbox courtesy of my brother. (He came across it at Brain Pickings, which is a wonderful blog.)
It’s by Saul Bass, the master designer, explaining how Ma Bell was to evolve the corporation’s brand identity in 1970. And it is a video that provides context for the logo update in such a way that it will forever impact how we prepare for Presentation Day.
Give yourself a half hour. You will be well rewarded. You’ll get a glimpse into Saul Bass’ genius, as well as gain a fascinating look at America from the master contextualizer.
Saul Bass Introducing AT&T's New Logo c. 1970

Side Note: Here’s a great picture I came across about context for architecture. Never saw it quite in this light, but makes perfect sense.

What surrounds your concept is just as important as the concept.

Great Works Wednesday: Your brand’s tag/slogan is just the tip of the ad iceberg

I know my blog entries usually highlight the great work that exists beyond the advertising and marketing world (yes, such a world exists). But this week I have chosen to highlight the great work that has been done by way of brand taglines.

By definition, a tagline’s is “A catch phrase or small group of words that are combined in a special way to identify a product or company.” Its purpose is to identify a business by key strengths and/or purposes. The goal is that your audience reads your tagline, immediately forms an impression of your brand, and then generally understands who you are and what you do. Or at the very least, the tag is evocative enough to inspire further interest in your brand.

If our owner and Tree Hugger in Chief, Greg, had a personal tagline, it might be:

Illustration by Colie McManus

Greg Fine- Mother Nature’s favorite child.

Seriously, we run paper through the printer twice. He bikes as much as possible and there are so many plants in our office, I feel like I am calling and speaking with clients from the midst of the Amazon jungle.

But a tagline can’t possibly capture everything about a business (or a person) in one sentence. Greg is more than an environmentalist. He is a husband, father, a wordsmith, Phish head and a terrible singer. My point being, you cannot expect a tagline to do too much. The goal is that the tagline leads in to and is supported in the larger context by an unforgettable advertising campaign built around a solid marketing strategy.

Let’s play a little game. Take a look at the tag lines below. Can you guess which companies they represent?
1. We’re cooking now.
2. Invent.
3. We’re behind you every step of the way.
4. One client at a time.

Be honest, how many of those did you really know? I am guessing very few, because when you take away the company name, these slogans fall a bit flat.

Check now:
1. Denny’s
2. Hewlett Packard
3. Huggies
4. Morgan Stanley

Here’s another tagline quiz. I’ll be shocked if you don’t get a 100%. Why? Because these taglines encapsulate their companies by identifying differentiating factors and artfully capturing the essence of the brand. And more to the point; they are memorable because each was supported by years of successful advertising.

1. The Happiest Place on Earth.
2. Think Outside the Bun.
3. Just Do it.
4. We Try Harder.
5. I’m Lovin’ it.
6. Have It Your Way.
7. The King of Beers.
8. Reach out and Touch Someone.
9. There are some things money can’t buy, for everything else there’s XXXX.
10. Betcha can’t eat just one.
11. Play. Laugh Grow.

Answers (not that you need them):
1. Disneyland
2. Taco Bell

3. Nike
4. Avis
5. McDonalds
6. Burger King

7. Budweiser
8. AT&T
9. MasterCard
10. Lays Potato Chips
11. Fisher Price

We are currently developing brand taglines for two of our clients. Each client is unique, and both need to stand out from their competitors. We are hammering out some grand slams, because we know what attributes distinguish these clients. And were combing our expertise and experience with INC.com’s, Five Tips to Writing an Effective Slogan.

1. Make sure it is pleasing to the ear
2. Highlight a key benefit
3. Explain the company’s commitment
4. Stay honest
5. Keep it short.

But the fact of the matter is, great slogans can never and should never be expected to carry the entire burden of telling your brand’s story. That’s the advertising’s job. From there, the tagline has to be allowed to develop and grow and take root. Like Greg’s hair. If he only had any.

About Great Works Wednesday
These are blog posts that shine a light on those people, places, institutions and organizations that do wonderful work. It’s a step outside of the daily marketing and advertising worlds that many of us occupy, and calls attention to the outstanding thinking that may inspire or help you see things in a different light. It is an online salute to the power of great works. Click here to see Ding’s Great Works.

Great Works Wednesday: Short-term stick-in-the-eye advertising says a lot more about your weaknesses than it does your competitor’s

Apple and Samsung are locked in a bloody death cage match-up that is nothing short of amazing. Amazing in the sheer capitalistic animosity that each company is revealing toward the other. For evidence, I submit Samsung’s latest TV spots, which take aim squarely at Apple’s evangelistic iPhone users.

One could argue the spots are not surprising – I’d be pissed, too, if I had to pony up a $1.5 billion judgment.

Retribution aside, though, Samsung is making a rash marketing decision.

Your competitor’s weaknesses: It is always tempting to reach for that low-hanging fruit to elevate your product or service’s strengths. You know where the competition’s soft white underbelly is. The research has pinpointed your rival’s most unappealing attributes. And so you encourage or allow your advertising agency to bite at the oh-so succulent comparative apple.

The problem is, if you have to bolster your product or service by bashing the competition, then your are ultimately admitting that your stuff isn’t good enough to stand on its own merits. Samsung’s screen is larger. It does other cool stuff the iPhone doesn’t do. So tell the world about it. Don’t opt for the low road, no matter how enticing the path may appear.

The other more far-reaching issue to consider is what you’re saying about your brand. It’s guaranteed that those Apple iPhone users who are being satirized in the TV spots will not be thinking about Samsung favorably. When they go to buy that new big screen or, heaven forbid, a new brand of phone, do you think they’ll have warm regards for the company that chose to skewer them? Nope.

It’s easy to bag on the other guy. But don’t be hasty. And don’t let your agency talk you into it.

Stand behind your brand’s products and services. And compete by taking the higher, longer, more difficult road. You may not sell as many phones tomorrow, but you ultimately win because you strategically kept your brand out of a silly street fight.

Great Works Wednesday: ARAMARK goes off menu for all the right reasons

The following Great Works exemplifies a company that is looking beyond its established mission to “do the right thing.” If you have any thoughts, I’d like to hear them.

Colie and I sit on an ad hoc committee that is tackling childhood obesity. The committee, called the K-8 Wellness Committee, has been together for the past 2 ½ years and has made great strides nudging kids, parents and educators within the Washoe County School District toward understanding the importance of physical activity and eating right. I’m very proud of the group’s accomplishments.
But the outcome from the subcommittee meeting we had the other day kind of blew my doors off.
The recently convened pow-wow was to address the K-8’s mission and objectives, many of which had been achieved and as such needed updating from their 2010 inception. Ken Cass, one of the K-8 founding members, who now works for ARAMARK, informed us his boss, Tony Cook, would be joining the our little meeting, too. Tony heads the local ARAMARK division that provides nutrition services for the School District’s elementary, middle and high school students. I was little surprised to hear of Tony’s imminent arrival, as I had only expected the four of us that day. (Kelli Seals from Washoe County Health Dept. was present and plays an important role on the committee as well.)
While we waited for Mr. Cook, Ken gave us the low-down on his new position (he retired in July as the Athletics Coordinator for WCSD). His job largely is to help ARAMARK devise a local strategy for restoring PE classes to all of the district’s grade schools. His words caught me off guard: Why would the WCSD’s nutrition services vendor step outside its food-services role and help a cash-strapped school district bring back physical education? That’s a bit off target from providing school kids breakfast, lunch and snacks.
So, I asked Ken what’s in it for ARAMARK, and he told me to put the question to Tony, which I did.
A little back-story on ARAMARK. It’s huge. It’s a ridiculously large, 250,000-employee, multi-national conglomerate that deals with everything from operational maintenance of buildings, to uniforms, to nutrition services for school districts like Washoe County. Huge. And nowhere on the corporate website does it mention that ARAMARK helps reinstitute PE programs. That seems off mission.
When I queried Tony about that fact, he simply said that it’s the right thing to do. ARAMARK’s nutrition services for this school district surpass those required by the FDA. They have received a Gold Rating from the Clinton Foundation’s Healthier Generations program; that’s no easy feat by any standard (you may not eat as well at home). But PE?
I’m paraphrasing Tony here, but he said something to the effect of: ARAMARK believes this will help kids in Washoe County be better students. With good nutrition AND exercise, the kids are in a better space for learning and growing.
Wow.
PE was killed by the state legislature a couple of years ago in an attempt to save money and jobs. The downside is that kids sit in their classrooms with no mandated means for moving their bodies. That lack of activity paired with poor eating habits have put our regional childhood obesity rates at stupid-high levels. Shameful levels. Statistics show that 34% of Washoe County kids are either overweight or obese.
The broad plan is to give education majors at the University of Nevada, Reno internship credits for overseeing the 63 grade school PE programs. Even though the students are doing it as part of their curriculum, there are still substantial costs, which ARAMARK is figuring out how to fund.
I’m pretty certain if this works here in northern Nevada, ARAMARK will roll this out to other school districts. This is my assumption and mine alone. Nothing Tony or Ken said indicated or implied that this is ARAMARK’s plan.
But I don’t care where they go with it. If ARAMARK and Washoe County School District can pull this off, which it looks like they might, it will be wonderful. I’ll keep you up to speed with developments. In the meantime, ARAMARK and the district deserve a quiet round of applause for their efforts. They’ve done a remarkable job in providing a solid nutrition program that goes above and beyond public policy standards. If they can do the same with this PE program we’re all the better for it.

About Great Works Wednesday

These are blog posts that shine a light on those people, places, institutions and organizations that do wonderful work. It’s a step outside of the daily marketing and advertising worlds that many of us occupy, and calls attention to the outstanding thinking that may inspire or help you see things in a different light. It is an online salute to the power of great works. Click here to see Ding’s Great Works.

Great Works Wednesday: What’s better? Christmas or Draft Day?

Draft Day 2011. Let's recap: My heart races and the seconds tick away as I hold a freshly dipped chip in my right hand and my stat notes in my left. Dad is on the line in my ear (there are no rules against this, it is simply frowned upon) and I can hear my competition jeer, “10 seconds Cole.” And with that, I proclaim my choice. AAAAAAAron Rodgers!

Aaron Rodgers is the quarterback for the Green Bay Packers and he was on my team. It was hello Fantasy Football Season and goodbye productive Sunday activities. Today's Great Work Wednesday is a salute to the industry known as Fantasy Football.

I know what you’re thinking. Girls don’t know football, and for the most part you’re probably right. To our credit, we aren’t really allowed to play it in school so we miss out on the pigskin basics. But that’s kind of the glory of Fantasy Football. People who would have never before traded their beloved Sunday on the ski slopes or shopping, suddenly find themselves couch-lounging and team-cheering. They are watching good ‘ol NFL football and they’re watching the game from start to finish.

Fantasy Football has them hooked. Whether they are playing in a free league for fun, a paid league with strangers, or a private league with friends and a pool prize, they watch and wait to see how their team will perform. The idea behind Fantasy is not to just pick the players on your favorite team (although somehow I always end up with more NY Giants on my team than anyone else…) or to pick the most handsome players, but to build a squad of power athletes from all different teams.

 

Then each Sunday or Monday, your team plays another team in the league and you earn points based on your players' actual statistical performance or their perceived contribution on the field of play.

Fantasy football is every where, there are even kids leagues. In 2009, FX  debuted a Fantasy Football sitcom called "The League."

Fantasy has had a substantial effect on the NFL ratings – they have had record-breaking years since 2009. I was reading an article in the LA times that put it perfectly, “The growth of the Internet has fueled the rise of fantasy football, and that in turn is driving record growth in NFL ratings. Fantasy has become the TV executives' friend for two reasons: It has vastly broadened the game's appeal to include people who previously followed football lightly or not at all, and it rewards viewers for paying close attention from kick-off to the game's final seconds. Fantasy has changed the meaning of the game far beyond the traditional rooting interest shared by hometown fans.”

My rookie Fantasy year I picked a kicker about the fourth round. I am still getting hell for it. To my credit it was Gostkowski, and he did get us a lot of points… Note, Kickers usually get chosen in the 7th or 8th round of the draft. Last year, Aaron Rodgers’ season alone launched me into the Fantasy playoffs. My draft is coming up this Friday and I am as anxious as Rudy Ruettiger running out on the Notre Dame pitch for the first time. Wish me luck and Go NY Giants!

 

About Great Works Wednesday

These are blog posts that shine a light on those people, places, institutions and organizations that do wonderful work. It’s a step outside of the daily marketing and advertising worlds that many of us occupy, and calls attention to the outstanding thinking that may inspire or help you see things in a different light. It is an online salute to the power of great works. Click here to see Ding’s Great Works.

Great Works Wednesday: Home Sweat Home

Exercise seems to be the new black nowadays.  You can post your workout achievements on your social media pages and track your running and biking distances on your iPhone.   Pair your exercise and smart phone with the latest neon Nike gear and you’ve got a dynamite combination. What isn’t new with exercise, though, is the difficulty for clearing the time to work out.

We all have reasons.  It’s hard.  It takes time and dedication to see results.  Gym memberships can be expensive.   Life is crazy and unpredictable, and usually exercise is not the top priority.  When we are short on time, you can’t skip work, but you can skip your work out.  Yadda, yadda, yadda…

I am a fitness lover.  My second career is leading “boot camp” programs and classes at two different gyms in downtown Reno.  I don’t wear camouflage, there are no whistles and I don’t yell, but my classes aren’t easy. The sessions are 60 minutes and are comprised of high-intensity cardio, lifting, plyometrics, lunges, squats and planks.  The group/team environment really pushes one to work hard individually and for the recognition from the “team.”

My classes will help you burn a lot of calories and if you set a goal and participate 3-5 days a week while watching your diet (The Fitness Gods say diet is 80% of the health equation and exercise is a mere 20%), you will see results.  But maybe you aren’t a fan of the group exercise experience?  Maybe your schedule doesn’t fit your gym’s class schedule.  Or perhaps the gym is an expense you had to exorcise from the budget?

So what can you do to fulfill your life-balance goal for health?

Ask the Internet Magic 8 Ball. BodyRock TV is a website that offers daily workouts you can do from home.   The only caveat is that you have to be self-motivated — but only for about 12 minutes a day. The workouts are brief, but intense. The trainers show you how to use your own furniture in place of gym equipment to execute key moves. The website is FREE and also supplies you with healthy recipes and dietary advice. The bonus of an in-home workout is that you don’t need to buy the latest neon workout gear or kick down for the new thigh-buster “as seen on the infomercial.“ You can get sweaty in your bathrobe and retainer and no one would know.

I frown upon our society’s need for instant meals and instant gratification - but BodyRock TV is the yin to the microwavable popcorn yang; these instant workouts are pretty badass. It’s an exemplary piece of market niche-filling and the ultimate antithesis to the standard Internet activity of sitting.

A friend has been using BodyRockTV workouts and recipes for a few weeks and says she has never been stronger.  Now, being a fitness instructor, this site does nothing to help my business, but first and foremost I am an advocate of health.  If this website can help someone reach their fitness goals, then I am all for it.  It’s fresh, offers new workouts everyday and is easy to use. But most importantly BodyRock TV can really help change a life

P.S. If workout classes happen to be your thing, there are many accomplished trainers doing incredible things for those looking to get healthy.  Below are links to a few awesome fitness programs in our Reno-Sparks area. If you’re outside the area and looking for a trainer, try here.

Anatomiereno.com
Korfitnessreno.com
Fastnv.com
camiecraggfitness.com/
formaxresults.com/mri

About Great Works Wednesday

These are blog posts that shine a light on those people, places, institutions and organizations that do wonderful work. It’s a step outside of the daily marketing and advertising worlds that many of us occupy, and calls attention to the outstanding thinking that may inspire or help you see things in a different light. It is an online salute to the power of great works. Click here to see Ding’s Great Works.